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Oregon Historical Logging             Old Oregon LoggingOld Oregon Historical Logging Images

 





 

Old Oregon

News-


The Willamette


Meteorite

 

via – Wikipedia, & The Magazine of the University of Oregon & other Internet resources. Researched and shared by Krysta Garrison via - ”K's Days Community - Oregons History” for informational purpose only.

 The Willamette Meteorite, officially named Willamette,[3] is an iron-nickel meteorite discovered in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the largest meteorite found in North America and the sixth largest in the world.[4][5] There was no impact crater at the discovery site; researchers believe the meteorite landed in what is now Canada or Montana, and was transported as a glacial erratic to the Willamette Valley during the Missoula Floods at the end of the last Ice Age (~13,000 years ago).[6] The meteorite is currently on display at the American Museum of Natural History, which acquired the meteorite in 1906.[5] Having been seen by an estimated 40 million people over the years, and given its striking appearance, it is among the most famous meteorites known 

The Willamette Meteorite weighs about 32,000 pounds (15,000 kg). It is classified as a type III iron meteorite, being composed of over 91% iron and 7.62% nickel, with traces of cobalt and phosphorus. The approximate dimensions of the meteorite are 10 feet (3 m) tall by 6.5 feet (2 m) wide by 4.25 feet (1.3 m) deep. The deep crevasses of the meteorite resulted from both its high-speed atmospheric entry and subsequent terrestrialization, i.e., weathering. Exposed to the elements for thousands of years, rainwater interacted with the mineral troilite, resulting in a form of sulfuric acid which slowly dissolved portions of the meteorite. This resulted (over a very long period) in the development of the hollows that are visible today. Willamette has a recrystallized structure with only traces of a medium Widmanstätten pattern; it is the result of a significant impact-heating event on the parent body.

 

The Willamette Meteorite was discovered in the Willamette Valley of Oregon near the modern city of West Linn. Although apparently known to Native Americans, its modern discovery was made by settler Ellis Hughes in 1902. At that time the land was owned by the Oregon Iron and Steel Company. Hughes recognized the meteorite's significance, and in an attempt to claim ownership, secretly moved it to his own land. This involved 90 days of hard work to cover the 3/4 mile (1200 m) distance. The move was discovered, and after a lawsuit, the Oregon Supreme Court held that Oregon Iron and Steel Company was the legal owner. Oregon Iron Co. v. Hughes, 47 Or 313, 82 P 572 (1905).[11]


Willamette Meteorite in the early 20th century

In 1905 the meteorite was purchased by Mrs. William E. Dodge for $26,000 (around $680,000 in 2011). After being displayed at the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition, it was donated to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City where it has since been on display.[12]

The meteorite was apparently venerated by the Clackamas tribe inhabiting the area where it was found. The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, a confederation of Native American tribes, used the meteorite, which they call Tomanowos, in ceremonies and demanded that it be returned and filed a NAGPRA action (Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) against the American Museum of Natural History in 1999. In response, the Museum filed a federal lawsuit seeking a declaratory judgment against the Grand Ronde in 2000. An agreement with the Museum was reached later that year in which the meteorite would remain at the museum with tribal members being able to conduct a private ceremony around the meteorite once a year, and that ownership will be transferred to Grand Ronde should the museum cease to have the meteorite on display.[13]

In response to a student's request in 2007, Representative John Lim introduced a resolution that would demand that the museum return the meteorite to Oregon. The tribes said they were not consulted, they did not support the resolution, and were content with the current arrangement with the museum.[14]

The 28-pound (13 kg) crown section of the meteorite that had been traded to the Macovich Collection for a Martian meteorite in 1997, was planned to be auctioned in October 2007, which led to claims by the Grand Ronde of insensitivity.[15][16][17] Bidders dropped out when an editorial in the Portland Oregonian newspaper asserted the Grand Ronde would file a lawsuit against the new owner, but the Grand Ronde disavowed the editorial and said they had no such intent, and that they couldn't stop the sale. While the newspaper printed an apology, the specimen was withdrawn.[18][19][20] A lawsuit was filed against the newspaper in Oregon Circuit Court and failed.[21]

A 4.5-ounce (130 g), 7.5-inch (19 cm) piece of the meteorite, also with a Macovich Collection provenance, was purchased in a 2006 auction and is on display at the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum in McMinnville, Oregon.

 

 


Crow Creek Road

Crow Creek Road

After hearing of stories with caves & giant crystals and reports of unusual area activity, I did some research. Many have wondered the same thing for a very long time, and I welcome you to help share your stories.

Crow Creek, Wallowa, Crow Creek is northeast of Enterprise and flows northward to join Joseph Creek. According to J.H. Horner of Enterprise, the stream was named by A.C. Smith and Jasper Matheny in the late 1870s because they found the birds so thick in the aspen groves along its banks.

Oregon Geographic Names Lewis A. McArthur Sixth Edition

Oregons Historical Society Press

Copyright © 992 Lewis L. McArthur, Portland, Oregon

 

Crow Ridge, Wallowa. This ridge lies between Joseph and Deer creek in the northeast part of the country. It was named for Bert Crow, first settler on the ridge in the early 1880s. He was the first man to take a wagon from this ridge down to Grande Ronde River.

Oregon Geographic Names Lewis A. McArthur Sixth Edition

Oregons Historical Society Press

Copyright © 992 Lewis L. McArthur, Portland, Oregon

Following the Crowfoot Road

Crowfoot Road is still narrow and winds its way uphill to Lost Creek Reservoir. The town of Derby and the railroad disappeared long ago.

From Medford, drive 13 miles north on Highway 62 to the Butte Falls Highway. Turn right, continue 7.5 miles and turn left onto Crowfoot Road. In less than eight miles you'll reach the Crater Lake Highway and Lost Creek Lake.

 

 

Opened for business in the summer of 1912, Crowfoot Road was a shortcut on the west side of Big Butte Creek, between what we now call the Butte Falls Highway and today's Lost Creek Lake. It served the small community of Derby, which sat about eight miles east of the Crater Lake Highway. The road replaced an old, inadequate, pieced-together wagon trail through the same area. Earlier, the primary route had been McNeil Creek Road. It followed along the east bank of Big Butte Creek and was steep to climb and difficult to travel, particularly in winter.

With the coming of the Pacific & Eastern Railroad and its new depot in Derby, Upper Rogue farmers, ranchers and timber men realized that a better road to the railroad would save them at least 20 miles of wagon hauling to Medford and beyond. A petition asking the county to make a new road caught the eyes of railroad executives who thought that one day they might run a spur line from Derby north to the Rogue River.

Historical information provided by: MCArthur
Oregon Geographic Names - Sixth Edition

 


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